A View of the Cost of Installing a Geothermal System

The cost of geothermal heat pumps installation is a major factor for the average homeowner in deciding whether to make the investment in lower energy bills and a better environmental footprint. Prices can seem high since geothermal, though it will save money in the long run, is more expensive up front than more conventional systems. However, it is important to consider what you will be getting and everything that will go into making the system reliable and efficient.

Geothermal Installation Costs

According to the U.S. Department of Energy, the average home can use a three ton system. At a cost of about $2,500 per ton, then, a system can easily cost $7,500 to be installed and made operational.

The biggest expense, one that is not involved in installing a conventional heating system, is the underground portion, known as the loop field. It makes up about 50 percent of the total cost of geothermal heat pumps installation and pays for a well driller to install pipes by drilling and/or excavating the property. The size of the field, and its total cost, will depend on several factors, including the size of the structure to be heated and the local climate.

Other Installation Elements

The system will be designed to suit the property and the home, so it is not a do-it-yourself project. Rather, it will require hiring those with expert technical knowledge and the specialized equipment to handle the job. This expert will visit the home to determine if the land will properly sustain a geothermal unit. They also will suggest the best system for the conditions.

In addition to designing and installing the outdoor piping, the contractor also must examine the existing ductwork to see if modifications will need to be made. Other elements of the system will include the installation of an air handler and the heat pump itself.

There may be tax benefits available to help defray some of the cost of a new system. Contact the experts at Gilbert Home Comfort for details.